Cognitive Behavioral Strategies

Lynne S. Gots, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist

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Why “Pure O”Isn’t Real

By Lynne Gots, posted on November 1st, 2021.

With all the misinformation about vaccines and health risks, you would think people might think twice about looking to the internet for diagnostic advice about their mental status. Sadly, this is not the case.

Despite the many credible sources (including this one) dispelling the myth of “pure O” OCD, I still get frequent queries from people who have diagnosed themselves as having “pure O” and are looking for treatment to help them get rid of their disturbing thoughts.

If you think you suffer from Pure O, you probably have been stuck in a repetitive thought loop about a distressing event or belief. You think you have obsessions without compulsions (such as the stereotypical ones like hand-washing and checking). But I guarantee you are engaging in rituals even if they are not readily apparent to an outside observer or only exist in your head.

Here are some common obsessional thoughts that may masquerade as Pure O:

I am a pedophile.

I have violent thoughts and may kill someone.

I might kill myself.

I have an underlying mental illness and will go crazy.

Let’s do some unpacking:

If you worry about having these types of thoughts, you are falling prey to a common OCD cognitive distortion: thought-action fusion—the belief that thinking about an action is the same as actually doing it.  Thought-action fusion can also cause you to believe, superstitiously, that having a thought will make the event more likely to happen.

Thoughts of committing a violent or repugnant act can feel very real. Such obsessions often lead to repeated attempts (compulsions) to push them away in order to relieve distress. Some common rituals are: mentally reviewing the past for signs of the feared action; seeking reassurance from friends and family; repeating a phrase or mantra (“I would never do that,” “I’m a good person”); praying; doing research about people who have committed the feared action and comparing yourself to them.

Trying to control thoughts only makes them more tenacious, as countless experiments on thought suppression have shown. Contrary to what the false notion of Pure O would have us believe, thoughts are not the problem!

OCD worries gain a foothold from the efforts to suppress thoughts, not from the thoughts themselves. The most effective way to deal with unwanted mental intrusions, then, is to allow them. In fact, if you stop trying to barricade the door against the unwelcome cognitive intruders and invite them in, they will lose their power over you in time.  Little by little, you will find it easier to realize they are not evidence of a deep-seated pathology or predictions of future actions. 

They are just products of an over-active imagination, nothing more.

So remember: “Pure O” is never pure, and don’t trust those who tell you otherwise.




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Posted in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder |

Is OCD Gaslighting You?

By Lynne Gots, posted on July 6th, 2021.

The term “gaslighting” is so widely used today that most people, aside from classic film buffs, don’t know its origin–most famously from the 1944 movie Gaslight. The story revolves around a woman, played by Ingrid Bergman, whose husband tries to convince her she is going insane by repeatedly dimming the lights, making loud noises and talking to himself in the attic while insisting she is hallucinating. 

In the psychological literature and in popular culture, gaslighting describes efforts to manipulate someone’s perception of reality in order to gain control over the person. Successful gaslighters make their victims question their memories and experiences and, in extreme cases, even doubt their sanity.

OCD is a master gaslighter. Sometimes called “the doubting disease,” it manipulates by causing the sufferer to question every action, thought, and recollection. A person who is trapped in an OCD spiral will wonder, “Can I trust I am remembering the situation accurately?”  “Did I really lock the door/turn off the stove/unplug the hairdryer?” “Did I ask for consent in that sexual encounter?” “Did I say something offensive?” “Did I cheat on that test?”

OCD is a sly, creative, and very destructive manipulator. 

People with shaky self-esteem and low confidence may find it especially hard to stand up to gaslighters and assert their own assessment of reality.  OCD undermines self-confidence and leads to excessive questioning, which feeds doubt.

In an interview for the podcast The Psychology of, I discuss the traps OCD sets, particularly in relation to moral scrupulosity and doubt, with psychologist Zac Rhodenizer.  Check it out to learn more about how to stop OCD from gaslighting you.




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Posted in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder |

How to Protect Your Mental Health During the Coronavirus Outbreak

By Lynne Gots, posted on April 1st, 2020.

In my last post, I talked about strategies for managing anxiety during these harrowing times. I have added some new tips for boosting psychological immunity and staying on track with sound mental health practices while sheltering in place in a post I wrote for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI).




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Posted in Articles, COVID-19 Mental Health, Depression, Health Anxiety, mindfulness, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Self-help, Techniques |

This blog is intended solely for the purpose of entertainment and education. All remarks are meant as general information and should not be taken as personal diagnostic or therapeutic advice. If you choose to comment on a post, please do not include any information that could identify you as a patient or potential patient. Also, please refrain from making any testimonials about me or my practice, as my professional code of ethics does not permit me to publish such statements. Comments that I deem inappropriate for this forum will not be published.

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If you don't receive a response to an email from Dr. Gots in 48 hours, please call the office and leave a voicemail message.

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